Rural Life (for the beginner)

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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Elaura » Tue Mar 24, 2015 2:39 pm

Oh, sorry, Shadow. I didn't see your post. It sounds like suburbia in India is a bit more primitive than even rural life here. That's what most Americans don't realize when they complain about a lack of amenities. 90% of the population of the world doesn't have what even the poorest Americans take for granted. Even our homeless can find clean running water and are accepted, triaged, and either treated or transported to a charity hospital, no matter what ER they go to. Also, anywhere in the US, if you can find a phone with a dial-tone you can call 911 and someone will come.

As for things I've learned . . .

Back to limescale. There are products, like CLR, which are marketed specifically for Calcium deposits, Limescale, and Rust. However, you'll want to read the fine print. They are not for use on stainless steel and I don't recommend them for any fixtures with a chrome or nickel finish, either. This pretty much means don't use it on anything but your toilet, sink, and tub, if you don't mind your drains losing their pretty finish.

People will tell you VINEGAR will take off those nasty deposits. Well, it will, but what they don't tell you is that it isn't just a wipe and it's gone. You really have to soak what you're trying to clean and I mean for days, if you really want to get that good-as-new look. For instance, our stainless steel dishwasher was encrusted. I poured a gallon of vinegar into it and waited a few hours. Only the edges showed any sign of loosening. I soaked it over night and got a little more. Finally, since the damn thing wasn't working anyway, I poured two gallons in and left it until I felt like dealing with it again. Several days, in fact. Guess what? I could wipe the remaining haze off with a scrubby sponge.

So, when it comes to using vinegar, if you're cleaning windows and mirrors, you can spray it on and wipe it off. If you are cleaning soap scum and scale, you really have to soak it, but it DOES work.

As for your toilets, porcelain sinks and tubs, I find "The Works" toilet bowl cleaner is much better than CLR. CAUTION, the works is very caustic. it will burn your skin and your lungs. ALWAYS open windows, doors, and use fans to disperse the fumes. It will also eat the finish off of your drains, but only if you leave it on too long (more than about a minute). I would pit The Works against a gas station toilet, but it might take more than one application. I wouldn't recommend using it on acrylic or fiberglass tubs, though. I've never tried it, but it seems it would probably eat them.
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Raym » Tue Mar 24, 2015 4:02 pm

I can hardly relate, population density here is such that even remote hamlets have aqueduct services, sewer system, etc.

And I thought I have had quite a time cleaning up my new place before moving in! :biggrin:

...no, it's not rural. On the contrary, I've moved to the very center of Rome, actually. :mockery:
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Elaura » Tue Mar 24, 2015 4:45 pm

Nahh, I've moved into tiny barracks rooms that I felt I had to spend days getting the crud out of every nook and cranny. Rome, huh? Must be amazing to live in such an ancient city. So much history, you never know if the dust you're cleaning is from yesterday or Caesar's time. I'd love to go back to Italy. One day in Venice is not much time to see anything.

I can understand the aqueducts, after all, Italy has had quite some time to get to all the remote places and that kind of architecture was built to last!
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby neildarkstar » Tue Mar 24, 2015 8:11 pm

Man, I can't handle cities at all anymore. Once, I thought it was cool to live in LA or Oakland, but one day I'd finally had all I could stand, so I packed a seabag hit the freeway with my thumb out, and never went back. Never missed it, either... :biggrin:
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Mr.Shadow1234 » Tue Mar 24, 2015 9:54 pm

OH no, you misjudged that, we had clean running water, not running HOT water, we had our Nokia 1100s, well, my parents at least. Well, then life took off, and here I am. So, yeah, even when I hear about people complaining how bad they are, and what has been going on with them, I tell them to look at how others are. People just don't realise.

But I still don't have 4G internet, or a car, just bikes.

My father's Biker gang helped us out as and when required.

My complaint about a suburb is the dust and grime.

Where we live, we have DSP and now DVC, one is a steel plant, and other is a hydel plant. We are literally showered with dirt...at least its better than Kolkata, you can't even breathe in kolkata.

Now, we have an Airport in the area though.

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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby neildarkstar » Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:34 pm

I remember my first trip to Mexico was to Cuidad Juarez. It was a business trip that took me to the factories for Farah Jeans, and Kenworth trucks. Anyway, just outside the gate and off to one side was an are filled with cardboard boxes. These were the homes of the poorer factory workers. A family of four to six might live in one refrigerator box, and boxes that big were considered prime real estate. I experienced a sort of culture shock on that trip... and I had felt almost the same thing on the Navajo reservation a few months earlier. I mean, "Forget running water, plumbing, electricity and AC, where the hell are the HOUSES?" was kinda my attitude...

EDIT:
Eh, the Kenworth factory was in Mexicali, just so you don't think it was all about Juarez.
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby fable2 » Thu Mar 26, 2015 11:40 pm

neildarkstar wrote:Man, I can't handle cities at all anymore. Once, I thought it was cool to live in LA or Oakland, but one day I'd finally had all I could stand, so I packed a seabag hit the freeway with my thumb out, and never went back. Never missed it, either... :biggrin:


What was it about living in a city that you couldn't stand? The noise, the lack of privacy, the speed, the environment, all of the above, or something else?

Though suburb bred, I've never had a problem with city life. Maybe because the ones I knew were divided into mini-culture zones, and knowing them really well formed anchors. With one notable exception that I mentioned above, I've found city living more intimate than suburban, but I can't say I've gotten much of a chance to live in cities. Too expensive by more than half. Would have liked to live in Boston, though. Or Fort Worth. Which may sound contradictory, but isn't.
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby neildarkstar » Fri Mar 27, 2015 3:30 am

I'd have to say it was "all of the above"... i Hated deiscovering I had to go someplace, looking at the clock and seeing that it was 4:30pm so I'd have to plan my trip with no left turns. Bumper to bumper traffic and blaring car horns that were pointless in any case. I loved LA in the summer... going for a walk in the park at 10pm, when the temp's 70 degrees with a light cool seas breeze... but then you had to watch out not to get dead while going for a walk. I'm a slightly paranoid type anyway (with good reason), so my nerves would never let me relax.

Then there were the people... I lived in a less than desirable neighborhood (because that was what I could afford), and my neighbors were druggie would-be actors, always looking for a fix, or the money to buy a fix, or a fast way to take somebody else's money. Prostitutes, dikes and fairies were the norm, and always to be preferred over crips or bloods. Really, I'm not anti-social, I just don't tolerate people well, so if they leave me alone, we're all happier. But it seems people just never want to leave you alone, eh? You gotta worry about the color of your hat, if it's red or blue, and who controls whatever area you're in at the moment. I almost had to shoot four guys one night because my buddy was wearing a red baseball cap in Crip country. That's the kind of thing that gets old in a hurry.

Then there are is the price of living. Food or clothing can usually be found cheaper in the city, but the rent and other things will take the food right out of your mouth unless you're scamming the system for whatever you can get. You can have a car, but there's no place to park it. If you can park it, it likely won't be there in the morning, or if it is, it'll be stripped unless you pay enough for parking and security to buy a new car every six months. Hell, you can't even stick your arm out the window of the car to signal a turn without some fool trying to steal your watch. I had a motorcycle part of the time, and it stayed in the living room when I wasn't on it.

Hot and cold running cockroaches (neighbors shooting them off the walls with a .357), girlfriends with the crabs, that were big enough to NEED a .357 to shoot them with... eh, what's to like? :biggrin:
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Raym » Fri Mar 27, 2015 7:08 am

Rome is ill-administered, otherwise it could be the best town to live in the world. Even so, it's still pretty impressive: I don't know many other cities that can boast a 2.700 years long history, without ever being razed to the ground, that is.

The place I've moved to is just a basement, really, one of those apartments used in the past by the building gatekeeper; it has been fully renovated though, so it's small but nice.

And I'm just a stroll away from a lot of places! The most famous park of the city, museums, clubs, and the bicycle track running along the Tiber. :)
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Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Elaura » Fri Mar 27, 2015 1:07 pm

Such a contrast! The ancient cities of Europe versus cities that outgrow their cement britches every 20 years.

Of course, every city, and town for that matter, in the US has a "wrong side of the tracks" and the consequences for being there range from being associated with dealers and druggies to being killed. I'd like to say the US is much safer than people think, because it's much more open country than crowded coast and people love to spread a wicked story over something calm and nice . . .

However, in the last five years the tiny town of ~25,000 that I live close to has been in the international news TWICE. The first was for the random shooting of an Australian sports star attending college in Oklahoma and the second was for a college student who murdered his whole family for the insurance.

Perhaps in other parts of the world the good and bad people are just easier to distinguish from one another than they are here? After all, a hairy, unwashed, biker in the US may be the gentlest soul you could ever meet and a dry-cleaned, tie-wearing metrosexual might be the guy to rip your throat out to get to your bank account.

Oh and baking soda takes out stains in plastic containers, but it helps to add hydrogen peroxide and a drop or two of dish soap. Another tip: if you need to get rid of skunk smell, a lot of people will recommend tomato juice. I'm not too keen on that, because if your animal happened to tangle with the front-end of the skunk, too, it will mask any open cuts or bleeding. The following is the best recipe we've found and is also how I discovered it takes the stains out of plastic containers.

1 quart of 3-percent hydrogen peroxide (or whatever they sell at walmart in the big bottles)
1/4 cup baking soda
1 teaspoon liquid dishwashing soap

Okay, here's a few caveats we learned by doing. Don't use this full-strength; it isn't necessary. Put it in a 2-3 quart pitcher and fill the rest of the way with tap water that is just warm on the inside of your wrist (like checking the temp of a baby's bottle). Don't get this in anyone's eyes, not yours, not your dog's and not the skunk's. This stuff will burn any cuts, scratches, or scrapes on you or your dog, and if your dog is like ours, you will have cuts and scratches by the time you're done even if you didn't before. That's okay, it'll stop as soon as you rinse and it has the added benefit of cleaning any wounds it comes in contact with. Also, hydrogen peroxide can bleach dog fur and clothing; rinse quickly, leaving it on won't help.

Directions: pour the pitcher over your dog, starting near the forehead, but away from the eyes, and rub it in, concentrating on the areas that got the most spray, usually the front legs, neck and chest. Rub it around with your fingers, but don't expect much of a lather. Be ready with the rinse water, tap water is fine. You know your dog and your water supply. Just don't let them get too cold and be careful they don't turn the hot water on while they are flailing to get away or climb you. At some point in this process, you should remove the collar. I know it will make it harder to control the dog, but a temporary chain or cloth "choke" leash will help. You can try soaking the collar in the same solution, it will definitely bleach it and probably won't take out the smell, but you can try.

Rinse well. Or as well as you can before your dog finds an escape route.

Optional: bathe your dog afterwards with its regular shampoo. We don't bathe our dogs unless they get skunked or roll around in anything dead, sticky, or oily. Normally, they don't stink and their coats are beautiful. They also don't have skin conditions. All dogs and owners are different, your experience may vary. Your skin as well as your dog's may be dry and itchy for a bit. Skin cream for you and a dab of conditioner for Fido should help, just be sure to rinse well.

Recommendations:

Use Dawn dishsoap. I hate spending too much for something, but I will pay extra when the difference in quality is obvious. Dawn really works on dishes, animals, and vehicles. I only have experience with the original blue stuff. If ever I suggest using dishsoap for anything, I'm talking about Dawn.
Be extra nice to your dog for as long as he/she will let you. Drying them with a towel is a good way to keep the house dry and let the dog know you aren't mad at him/her. After all, it wouldn't have happened if they weren't doing their job: protecting the family from varmints.
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