Rural Life (for the beginner)

Delicate thoughts of a dangerous mind.

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Drakkmore » Fri Mar 27, 2015 2:30 pm

Elaura wrote:
Oh and baking soda takes out stains in plastic containers, but it helps to add hydrogen peroxide and a drop or two of dish soap. Another tip: if you need to get rid of skunk smell, a lot of people will recommend tomato juice. I'm not too keen on that, because if your animal happened to tangle with the front-end of the skunk, too, it will mask any open cuts or bleeding. The following is the best recipe we've found and is also how I discovered it takes the stains out of plastic containers.

1 quart of 3-percent hydrogen peroxide (or whatever they sell at walmart in the big bottles)
1/4 cup baking soda
1 teaspoon liquid dishwashing soap

Okay, here's a few caveats we learned by doing. Don't use this full-strength; it isn't necessary. Put it in a 2-3 quart pitcher and fill the rest of the way with tap water that is just warm on the inside of your wrist (like checking the temp of a baby's bottle). Don't get this in anyone's eyes, not yours, not your dog's and not the skunk's. This stuff will burn any cuts, scratches, or scrapes on you or your dog, and if your dog is like ours, you will have cuts and scratches by the time you're done even if you didn't before. That's okay, it'll stop as soon as you rinse and it has the added benefit of cleaning any wounds it comes in contact with. Also, hydrogen peroxide can bleach dog fur and clothing; rinse quickly, leaving it on won't help.

Directions: pour the pitcher over your dog, starting near the forehead, but away from the eyes, and rub it in, concentrating on the areas that got the most spray, usually the front legs, neck and chest. Rub it around with your fingers, but don't expect much of a lather. Be ready with the rinse water, tap water is fine. You know your dog and your water supply. Just don't let them get too cold and be careful they don't turn the hot water on while they are flailing to get away or climb you. At some point in this process, you should remove the collar. I know it will make it harder to control the dog, but a temporary chain or cloth "choke" leash will help. You can try soaking the collar in the same solution, it will definitely bleach it and probably won't take out the smell, but you can try.

Rinse well. Or as well as you can before your dog finds an escape route.

Optional: bathe your dog afterwards with its regular shampoo. We don't bathe our dogs unless they get skunked or roll around in anything dead, sticky, or oily. Normally, they don't stink and their coats are beautiful. They also don't have skin conditions. All dogs and owners are different, your experience may vary. Your skin as well as your dog's may be dry and itchy for a bit. Skin cream for you and a dab of conditioner for Fido should help, just be sure to rinse well.

Recommendations:

Use Dawn dishsoap. I hate spending too much for something, but I will pay extra when the difference in quality is obvious. Dawn really works on dishes, animals, and vehicles. I only have experience with the original blue stuff. If ever I suggest using dishsoap for anything, I'm talking about Dawn.
Be extra nice to your dog for as long as he/she will let you. Drying them with a towel is a good way to keep the house dry and let the dog know you aren't mad at him/her. After all, it wouldn't have happened if they weren't doing their job: protecting the family from varmints.


About 7 years ago my Dad's Golden Retriever Chase got got by a skunk. We tried everything imaginable, and nothing worked. Not the tomato juice, or any of the miracle washes that you can buy from the local vet, or pet supply place. Nothing. The only thing we could do for the poor guy was wait for the smell to dissipate. I'm here to tell you right now if you ever get sprayed by a skunk tomato juice will do nothing for you, but to make you orange for a little while. Also if you care at all for the appearance of your lawn, don't have skunks on it. Skunk spray will kill the grass over night, and it will take a while for it to grow back in. And hope that your dog doesn't catch it right in the eyes like Chase did, his eyes watered constantly for a week after the skunk sprayed him (that's about a quarter of the time the stink lasted). Chase got new accessories after his encounter with the skunk, everything was ruined.



As for my rural advice. Up hear near the frozen tundra where I live we find it wise to keep at least three weeks worth of food in the house at all times, especially in the winter, Also a generator is a must to keep the frozen meats from thawing when the power goes out.
User avatar
Drakkmore
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:34 am

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Elaura » Fri Mar 27, 2015 4:54 pm

Drakkmore wrote:As for my rural advice. Up hear near the frozen tundra where I live we find it wise to keep at least three weeks worth of food in the house at all times, especially in the winter, Also a generator is a must to keep the frozen meats from thawing when the power goes out.



Oh, definitely. Especially since it's almost required that you have a chest freezer. You never know when someone is going to offer you some deer meat or a side of beef at a really good price and if you don't have the space to store it, you have to pass and you'll never be offered it again by that person.

Generator is a must, too. Unfortunately, folks don't realize a whole house genny is pretty cost prohibitive and then you still have to keep it fueled. You have to prioritize what you really need on the generator power if you don't have the cash to buy one of the big ones. Fridge and freezer are tops on the list and, of course, any medical equipment like oxygen concentrators and CPAP machines. After that might be the well, if you have the power, but it isn't necessary. You can make a simple hand-held pump out of PVC and if you have water stored, even if it isn't drinkable, it'll still flush your toilet.

Food for your pets is something people often forget when putting together a list of what they'll need if the power goes out.

One way to keep your power on in the first place is to make sure your lines aren't going through or running too close to any trees. After the power company came out and we told them to take down anything they thought might be a problem, we've seen a fraction of the power outages we used to and it's never just us anymore.

As for keeping skunks off your property? Good freakin' luck. Like all rodents, if they can get their head through an opening they can get their body through. They also dig. We have adequate fencing to keep a dachshund, a Boston terrier and a chihuahua in, but it isn't enough to keep the rabbits, possums, skunks, deer, snakes, or even armadillos out. Although skunks and armadillos can easily dig under a fence, they can also climb. No big deal, though, we don't have a lawn, so much as a pasture for a yard.

Speaking of rodents . . . field mice and wood rats are a given in the country. You can keep them at bay many ways, but we've found the best way is the traditional spring-loaded trap. It is quick, efficient, and re-usable, yet cheap enough to throw away if it gets too messy.

Things not to use and why:

Poison. Don't trust the label. "No secondary kill" simply means that it won't kill cats, dogs, owls, falcons, and other birds, outright if they pick up the dead or dying mouse or rat killed by the bait. However, our vet has to ask every pet owner if their animal has come in contact with rat poison because it prevents clotting. Might not die from eating that mouse, but poor Morris will bleed to death if he gets wounded. Even if you don't have pets, who wants the owls and other rodent hunters to die? Also, the rodents will not die immediately. They'll make it just far enough that you won't know where that horrible smell is coming from.

Glue traps. Unless you like the sound of screaming rodents in the middle of the night. It's a slow, painful, and loud death for the critter. The glue does not ever come off and if left unattended long enough, you might find just a foot stuck to the glue and a trail of blood leading to the space between your walls.

"No-kill" traps. No kill my eye. First of all, the little plastic boxes are like saunas and anything caught in it is likely to die of dehydration long before you check the trap. They are more expensive and once they've harbored one corpse, you really don't want to wash and re-use. Even if you use a cage and the trap is well-ventilated, what are you going to do with the live rodent you now possess? You'll really annoy your neighbors if you let it loose close to home and taking a road trip every time you catch a mouse or rat will annoy you.

Non-neutered cats, feral or domesticated. The cats will multiply like crazy and you'll have to endure long nights of caterwauling. They also attract disease carrying critters as well as bobcats.

Neutered cats, this one is up to you. Whether feral or domesticated, they will have to be kept hungry for them to be good mousers and ratters. They will also kill songbirds.

So, the best way to catch mice and rats is with a cheap wooden spring trap. The best use of these traps is often on the package, but here's what we've learned: rodents prefer to stay out of the open and close to the walls. Find the place where they are coming and going. Place TWO traps right next to one another, with the business ends up against the wall. Rodents will often jump over the first obstacle and then land on the second trap. We use the kind of traps with the yellow plastic platform and put peanut butter on it in the middle of the hinge. There is usually a pointy piece of plastic there for securing other baits. It isn't easy to get sticky peanut butter off the trap without sitting on the trigger plate.

And don't expect to ever rid your land of unpleasant critters, the goal is simply to keep them at bay and out of your pantry. For those who hate snakes and spiders, just don't move out into the country. Snakes eat rats and mice and spiders eat flies, mosquitoes, and scorpions. Upset the balance and you really won't like it.
Available for weddings, funerals, hand fasting, and baptisms.
Image
User avatar
Elaura
Chaplain
 
Posts: 2473
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 12:52 am
Location: About ten feet to Jac's left.
Title: Mrs.
Gender: Female

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Drakkmore » Sat Mar 28, 2015 12:12 am

I have a lot of owls, and snakes as well as feral cats in the area. my rodent problems are pretty low right now.
Well the rodents that I see any way. I have a lot of rabbits in my yard though which are rodents I guess, but mouse type varmint rodents are low. I see no tracks in the winter, and no spore either.
Another suggestion if it can be used as a food source, I wouldn't chase it off my property. Just make sure it is cleaned,and cooked fully before consuming it.
User avatar
Drakkmore
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:34 am

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Drakkmore » Sat Mar 28, 2015 12:13 am

And also....
MMMMMMMMMMMMM venison.
User avatar
Drakkmore
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:34 am

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby neildarkstar » Sat Mar 28, 2015 12:16 am

Hah! I don't mind snakes. I make belts and hatbands out of rattlesnakes, and we used to keep pet bullsnakes to get rid of those varmints you're talking about. Spiders don't bother me either, and they do a great job keeping flies and such in line. nature has its own remedies, eh? :biggrin:

"If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans." - Movie "Flypaper"
User avatar
neildarkstar
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 2839
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 7:57 pm

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Drakkmore » Sat Mar 28, 2015 1:24 am

Lol
I kill any spiders I see on sight.
I really don't like them.
User avatar
Drakkmore
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:34 am

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Elaura » Sat Mar 28, 2015 2:15 pm

Maybe it's too cold for them up there, but down here, if you kill all the spiders you get an extra large crop of scorpions. The spiders keep the scorpion population in check and vice-versa.

Don't get me wrong, we kill what gets in the house. We use traps for the mice and rats, flyswatters for the spiders, scorpions, bees, wasps and hornets, and we have a couple of machetes for the snakes. I feel sorry for the snakes, but we're not herpetologists. We don't know poisonous from non-poisonous, so they all get the chop. I wish you were closer, Neil, we'd give the carcasses to you.

We don't see any animals larger than snakes inside our fence; if they get in, they are usually gone by the time we know they were there. Of course we have a .22 a .45 and a shotgun for any intruders of the two-legged variety, but those varmints are a bit like gophers, they don't show their faces as long as you have a yard full of dogs.

Note on using machetes to kill small animals: use the blunt side right behind the head. It's an easier hit and it isn't as likely to slide off or damage what is underneath. It breaks the neck instantly if you hit it hard enough and you only have one piece of critter to get rid of instead of two. CAUTION: critters with their necks broken may still bite reflexively. Venomous snakes are still venomous and rabies is still an issue with the furry ones. Handle with care and preferably as little as possible. You don't want their fleas falling off either.
Available for weddings, funerals, hand fasting, and baptisms.
Image
User avatar
Elaura
Chaplain
 
Posts: 2473
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 12:52 am
Location: About ten feet to Jac's left.
Title: Mrs.
Gender: Female

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Mr.Shadow1234 » Sun Mar 29, 2015 3:58 am

neildarkstar wrote:Hah! I don't mind snakes. I make belts and hatbands out of rattlesnakes, and we used to keep pet bullsnakes to get rid of those varmints you're talking about.


Killing snakes, making snake leather stuff is strictly illegal where I live. If you want to buy snake leather, you have to fill in a huge list of your particulars and then will you get to pay a huge sum of money. Did I mention that both the manufacturer and retailer have to be registered? If not, bye bye belt.

And Elaura, about machetes, the handle if not of good quality, or if not properly fixed in place, will become loose after a lot of chops, and the blade may fly off. Check the handles periodically for any damage, and if something is detected, change ASAP, or you risk accidents. That is why I prefer knives.

I don't think I have to tell you anything about gun safety, you've been in the army after all.

Shadow
Mr.Shadow1234
Protector
 
Posts: 601
Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2014 12:54 pm
Location: One foot in the grave, the other in hell.
Title: Reaper

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby Drakkmore » Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:12 am

Or one can be like me, and buy only machetes that have full tang, and two wood scales riveted to the tang. Even if the Rivets both wear out you still have a grasp on the tang of the handle. Of course rivetes tend to wear out one at a time, or unevenly so you have some warning to get new rivets, and drill out the old ones.
User avatar
Drakkmore
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 360
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:34 am

Re: Rural Life (for the beginner)

Postby neildarkstar » Sun Mar 29, 2015 10:22 am

@ Shadow:
Well, all I've got to say is that's the sort of bureaucratic nightmare that many butthole Americans dream of putting in place here. the nice thing about Americans is that while they respect law and order, they don't mind breaking laws that they don't like. Like Prohibition, drug laws, speed limits, and so forth. If they were to outlaw snakeskin belts and hatbands here, the price of such things would go through the roof, and they'd be more popular than ever. I've charged as much as $500 for a snakeskin belt with rattles as it is. If it were illegal, I could probably get at least $1500.

I had a guy once tell me my prices were too high, so I handed him a clothes hanger and a gunny sack. I told him if he'd go catch it the snake himself, I'd make the belt for half price... Turned out he didn't think that was such a good idea. :biggrin:

@ Elaura:
I do not like scorpions. No, never, not at all. I do not like them in my shoe, I do not like them in my hall. I do not like scorpions, no not at all. :fingerwag:

I was thinking about it and, I don't believe I've ever bought a machete... I have buck knives with 10 inch blades, a collection of hunting and fishing knives, a katana, a Claymoor, some weird kinda half-sword my daughter bought me for my birthday, but no machete...
"If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans." - Movie "Flypaper"
User avatar
neildarkstar
Jac's Hero of the Day
Jac's Hero of the Day
 
Posts: 2839
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 7:57 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Welcome to my parlor . . .

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

  • Advertisement
cron